CLI sync for GitLab, GitHub, Codeberg

This article focuses on syncing GitLab, GitHub, and Codeberg directly from the command line using git pull or push commands. Unlike mirrored repositories, these repositories will remain independent of each other, eliminating the need for different remote names.

However, if you're interested in maintaining a mirrored copy of GitLab in GitHub or vice versa, GitHub provides a specific article for that purpose.

If your aim is to keep GitHub and GitLab repositories independent, follow these guidelines:

1. Adding SSH Keys to Your Local Machine (Optional Step)

While you can use the same keys for each Git source, I prefer using different keys for different sources. Generate unique SSH keys for Codeberg, GitLab, and GitHub:

ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "some@mail.com" -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa_codeberg
ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "some@mail.com" -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa_gitlab 
ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "some@mail.com" -f ~/.ssh/id_rsa_github

Add the public keys to Codeberg, GitLab, and GitHub:

Register the keys on your local machine:

ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa_codeberg
ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa_github
ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa_gitlab

2. Editing ~/.ssh/config

Edit the ~/.ssh/config file with the following content:

Host codeberg.org
    HostName codeberg.org
    User git
    IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa_codeberg
Host gitlab.com
    HostName gitlab.com
    User git
    IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa_gitlab
Host github.com
    HostName github.com
    User git
    IdentityFile ~/.ssh/id_rsa_github

3. Configuring Repositories and Remotes

4. Checking Remote Repositories

To check all the remotes for the repository, run:

git remote -v

The command should return something like:

origin  https://github.com/username/repository_name.git (fetch)
origin  https://github.com/username/repository_name.git (push)
origin  https://gitlab.com/username/repository_name.git (push)
origin  https://codeberg.org/username/repository_name.git (push)

Now you can simply use git push, and it will push changes to all remotes.

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